Why Boondocking in the Desert

20170107_150138Good morning trail partners. In the last post Jagger got anxious and pushed our adventure along. I’ve linked some of the photos for the lost dirt mound below. We camped here last year too. It’s better known as The Lost Dutchman State Park. It’s a wonderful state park with both electric and non electric sites. I’ve also put a link below to the campground review.


Boondocking in the Desert

Recently we’ve found ourselves with destinations lacking internet making posts scarce. But don’t think that has affected our adventures!

Just outside of Ehrenburg, Arizona there is a great boondocking site that I never would have found myself. The roads (or lack of them) are not a good place to drag the Coach. But thanks to our scout, Tennessee, here we are. This is the second time I owe a big thanks to an experience I probably wouldn’t have ever found. Tennessee went ahead of us and found the access to a remote patch of ground out in the desert. Here as you can imagine, there is no water or utilities. In fact other than a few bushes, a cactus or two, the coyotes and a few snakes there isn’t much. What you will find is peace, wonderful sunsets and a few friends. Oh and a great area for Jagger to run off leash, and the price is right, $0. It’s a good place to adjust the budget.

Arriving

Flying J Erhenburg AzJohn (Tennessee) also found a business, less than ten miles away, willing to sell water and empty my waste tanks when needed. The Coach’s fresh water tank hold about 60 gallons which is enough to last me about two weeks of boon-docking. My waste tanks will hold that and a little more. During the weeks ahead, I will grab another 20-30 gallons and pump on board into my fresh water holding tank. It’s one of the nice features of my rig that I have used many times. My drinking water I buy from the store. It will take conservatively 7 gallons a week to provide both drinking and some cooking water. Once I’m loaded up, I head into the desert to an area Tennessee has scouted. It’s a perfect spot, not too close to anyone else. I don’t want close company and I’m sure most feel the same way out here. It’s a place of solitude for the most part and there is plenty of room to spread out.

Why do I like it?

So stark and vast. What appears to be full of empty ground covered with dirt and rocks is actually known as caliche (kəˈlēCHē). It’s found in the dry slopes and plains of the largest desert in North America, the Chihuahuan Desert. It’s favorable to the growth of Creosote bushes up to 4,000 feet in elevation, with Creosote bushes and  forms of grass here and there as far as you can see. The winds blow incessantly, primarily from the southwest. This year we also had a lot of rain in the early months of Winter. Here the Rattlesnakes slither and the coyotes howl. Occasionally you will see a desert fox, but few birds. It’s reported that there are even a few Mexican Gray Wolves, but I haven’t seen one. Probably further south in the Chihuahuan Deserts of Mexico.

There is no doubt about it, this is a place where I quiet down and turn somewhat inward. Staying in my Coach for most of the day, feeling it rock back and forth from the wind. Here I can also save on resources, learn to live on much less of everything and appreciate what I do have.

Sad sights are too often seen :(There is very little you can see, that’s left anyway, of people visiting here before me. A pile of unnatural rocks here and there, a few of those have been used for fires, but even that fades with the wind and hot sun during the summers. It’s an unforgiving place, especially summer. Don’t get lost without water or it could be your undoing. Occasionally you’ll see some trash left behind by some careless soul, becoming a blight on the horizon  Not me, I’m extra careful here, I hope my descendants  will enjoy this place someday, so I’m careful and leave only footprints.

Safe travels…Gary and Jagger

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End of a Beautiful Day

 

More Photos: Lost Dutchman State Park

Campground Review: Lost Dutchman State Park Campground

Read More: Chihuahuan Desert

 

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4 Comments

  1. John L. June 14, 2017 Reply
  2. Rob June 14, 2017 Reply

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